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Savoring the Taste of Blue Cheese

Blue Cheese

Photo Credit: Artizone https://goo.gl/Hfby2x

As the name implies, blue cheese is a type of cheese with blue, gray, or bluish-green veins. These veins are caused by the presence of Penicillium glaucum, or Penicillium gorgonzola, or Penicillium roquefort. The bacteria from these strains create free flowing blue patterns and give the cheese a distinctive aroma. Blue cheeses have a strong flavor that goes well with several wines.

The Discovery of Blue Cheese

The highly prized blue cheese was discovered by accident when the mold developed naturally in cheeses that had been stored in caves where the bacteria were naturally present. Sometime after this happened, someone evidently decided to taste the cheese. The cheese makers found out that contrary to what they feared, the blue cheese did not ruin their product. Instead, the mold gave their cheese a unique taste and texture. The rest, as they say, is history. [Read more…]

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Australia’s Sparkling Wines

Sparkling WineSparkling wines come from all over the world, but not all of them can be called champagne. That name has been protected since 1891 and can be used only by wines produced in the Champagne region of France in compliance with the process prescribed by the Comité Interprofessional du vin de Champagne. Even if other wines are made from the same grape variety and use the same process as champagne, they can only be referred to as sparkling wines. Fortunately, as the saying goes, “a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”

A New World “Sparkler”

Along with the United States, Chile, and South Africa, Australian champagne is sometimes referred to as a New World sparkler. However, Australian wine historians will insist that the country has produced sparkling wine since the 1890s. The only thing is the Australian’s bubbly was not made with grapes classified as classic Champagne varieties. It was only n 1960 that the Hawke Bay’s Mission Vineyard produced sparkling wine – wine using Pinot Meunier, Pinot Gris, and Folle Blanche, and produced according to the “classic” champagne method. Today, there are more than two dozen Australian producers of good sparkling wines. [Read more…]

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Brunch and Wine Pairing Just as the Sun Rises

Brunch with wineDrinking at breakfast sounds odd, even bizarre. But during the weekends when your breakfast isn’t too early (or brunch), the right pairing with what is served – pancakes, eggs, burgers or some other breakfast concoctions  – can lend the morning meal some heartiness. Jim Clarke’s Drinking in the Morning at Star Chef’s Easter Brunch suggests it is great for Easter. Though anyone who loves having a great morning or weekend, can find the suggestion a welcome one. Clarke says,

“… We typically pay tribute to our breakfasty beverages by supercharging them—OJ becomes a mimosa; tomato juice, a bloody mary. Coffee remains unadulterated—the caffeinated counterbalance to your morning alcohol—but do we really need to cut our alcohol with fruit juice to make it socially acceptable?”

Light Choices for Egg-based Breakfast

No, vodka or whiskey or anything as hard is not suggested with eggs benedict or any light dish for breakfast. Rather, lighter stuff is suggested to make decent pairings at this time of the day; Champagne with orange juice, citrusy Chardonnay or any sparkling wine pairing with omelets, quiches and egg benedict. [Read more…]

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