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Coq au Vin – More Than Just a Chicken Dish

Coq au Vin

Photo Credit: Will Clayton https://goo.gl/EBYhhn

When you hear the words “coq au vin” your mind is immediately filled with images of a French culinary masterpiece that only the best chefs can create. For the longest time, this was exactly true. Today, however, with the intervention (and translation) of artists like Julia Child, it has become fairly easy to make coq au vin in your own kitchen. Now you can serve chicken for you Sunday dinner and know that it is more than just an ordinary casserole.

Coq au Vin in the Past

Today, coq au vin can be described simply as a chicken dish braised with mushrooms, bacon, and wine. Burgundy is usually used for this dish, but Riesling, Beaujolais, Champagne, and other wines are also used in many kitchens across France. [Read more…]

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Treat Yourself to Feta, Fruit, Vegetables, and Wine

Feta combined with fruits, vegetables and wineAll cheeses have their own distinctive qualities, but feta, one of the world’s freshest cheeses, has a flavor all its own. It is basically a soft but compact cheese sans holes and the skin present in cheeses like brie and camembert. Usually sold in blocks submerged in brine, this cheese can range from sharp to very mild. This makes it ideal for mixing with fruits and vegetables. If you have been looking for a new way to serve your fruit or your salad with cheese, give this wholesome creation a try.

Telling Feta from Other Cheeses

People from all over the world can make “feta” cheese if they have the tools, the sheep’s milk, and the goat’s milk to do so. However, because the name feta is protected under EU laws as a PDO (protected designation of origin) product, the cheese they produce can’t be called feta unless it is made in the traditional way in the mainland of Greece or the island of Lesbos.

Most cheeses that claim to be feta are made of cow’s milk, and this cheese has to be made from at least 70 percent ewe’s milk and no more than 30 percent goat’s milk. By their very nature both have a flavor different from cow’s milk, and the cheese made from them is tangier. Moreover, the humidity, the climate, and the natural bacteria in mainland Greece and Lesbos contribute to the unique taste of feta cheese. [Read more…]

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