post

The Challenges in Making a Crown of Roast Lamb

Crown of Roast Lamb

Photo Credit: Artizone https://goo.gl/gtwrtf

Crown of roast lamb is one of the most delicious and elegant dishes you can serve as the centerpiece of a celebratory meal. It is a dish that can stymie the ordinary cook, but a second look at how it is created will show that it is not all that difficult to prepare.

In the Foolproof Way to Cook Crown Roast of Lamb posted in Serious Eats, Daniel Gritze says, “Regal. I think that may be the best word for a crown roast of lamb—lamb racks that are tied together end-to-end into the shape of a crown. And just like the crowns that grace the heads of monarchs, crown roast of lamb is all about presentation.”

Creating the Crown: Ask the butcher to do it!

Possibly the first major challenge in creating a crown of roast is getting the ribs into that lovely shape. Daniel Gritze says: “…A lamb crown roast is formed by connecting at least two racks, usually with seven or eight bones each, end-to-end. The racks themselves come from the loins that run on either side of the lamb’s spine, with the rib bones attached (for presentation, those rib bones are frenched, or cleaned of meat and sinew). To get the normally straight racks into a curved shape, the butcher makes slits between each of the rib bones on the back sides of the racks (the sides that form the outer wall of the crown roast), allowing them to be flexed like an accordion…” The good news is, the butcher should be able to do that for you.

[Read more…]

Please like & share:
post

Flambéed Desserts – New Year with a Bang

Flambeed desserts

Photo Credit: Ewen Roberts https://goo.gl/iixoDw

Firecrackers and fireworks are not the only way to welcome the New Year with a bang; apart from these, however, desserts can also express the same celebratory spirit.  Flambéed desserts are one of the best ways to do this.

Cherries Jubilee 

Auguste Escoffier is credited with inventing Cherries Jubilee, a flambéed dessert made of cherries and liqueur. This dish is said to have been prepared for the 1897 Jubilee celebrations of Queen Victoria.

Rachel Ray of the Food Network has an easy recipe for Cherries Jubilee. Her recipe calls for two cans of whole Bing cherries, a tablespoon each of sugar and cornstarch, ¼ cup of warmed cognac or kirsch, and vanilla ice cream. [Read more…]

Please like & share:
post

Food for a Lucky Chinese New Year

Lucky Chinese New YearThe Chinese New Year falls on the first day of the first month of the lunar calendar. Thus, it does not always fall on the first day of January. For 2016, February 8 will be New Year’s Day and traditional Chinese celebrations will include not only a barrage of firecrackers but also a menu consisting of dishes to bring good luck.

Oranges and Tangerines for Good Luck and Wealth

If you’ve ever wondered why most Chinese restaurants will slice up an orange for you at the end of your meal, you will be glad to know this fruit symbolizes good luck for you. In Community Table’s “7 Foods to Eat for Good Luck on Chinese New Year”, Shannon McCook says: Displayed as decorations and given as gifts, the tangerine is said to represent wealth and the orange brings good luck. While their bright vibrant colors lend themselves to the spirit of the day, their associations with wealth and luck originate in how similar the Cantonese word for tangerine is to wealth, and the Cantonese word for orange is to luck.” [Read more…]

Please like & share:
post

Light Cooking With Wine

Cooking With WineCooking with wine can wonderfully transform a simple fare into a rich and elegant gourmet. If you are not so adept at using wine when cooking, however, you may find the exercise a bit daunting. What rules must you remember to make a decent start? If you want your dish to burst with complex layers of flavors, start with a good wine. Julia Child once said, “If you do not have a good wine to use, it is far better to omit it, for a poor one can spoil a simple dish and utterly debase a noble one.”  

Aside from the flavors it can render your dish, wine is good to use because it is one ingredient that can make it less fattening. Elaine Magee, MPH, RD of WebMD Weight Loss Clinic shares some great insights in her post 6 Secrets of Cooking With Wine. She writes: [Read more…]

Please like & share:
post

Food Tips to Ponder When Whipping the New Year Feast

New Year's foodNew Year is celebrated with a big bang anywhere in the world. It is an occasion when one reflects on the events of the year past while hoping that the change of calendar will bring good tidings. Though superstitions have almost no place in this millennium, those that have bearings to New Year and good luck have perpetuated to this very day.

Tyler Fox, a chef and blogger shares with the readers some of the symbolisms meant to sway the fortunes of the coming year in this post from The Kansas City Star’s Good Food, Good Fortune: Try these traditional recipes to bring luck in the New Year. He writes: [Read more…]

Please like & share:
post

Toshikoshi Soba: Bring in the Luck

toshikoshi soba

Photo Credit: Hisakazu Watanabe https://goo.gl/UaUSrf

Wishing for a long, healthy life and relationships come first in most people’s New Year wish list. If it I your wish that these “wishes” come true and for you home and life to be cleared of any bad luck, why not include Toshikoshi (year-end)  soba in your pre-midnight fare?

The Toshikoshi Soba (年越しそば) Tradition

Slurping up a bowl of Toshikoshi soba is a traditional Japanese way of welcoming the New Year (omisoka) in the accompaniment of the ringing of the temple bells (joya-no-kane) at midnight. Christian Kadluba writes in a post Toshikoshi Soba, The Japanese have welcomed the New Year with soba noodles for hundreds of years. While the true origins of the tradition are lost in time, there are several theories.” Though the origins aren’t clear anymore, its meaning has not been lost. [Read more…]

Please like & share:
post

Foods to Bring Good Luck for the New Year

Foods to Bring Good LuckThe coming of the New Year awakens the hope that things will go well, and this often prompts people to do whatever they can to make this happen. Proof of this: in many houses all over the world, the New Year’s table will contain foods that are believed to attract good luck.

Noodles

Because of their shape, noodles are customarily associated with long life. Thus, in several Asian countries, noodles are served on New Year. In Woman’s Day’s  10 Good Luck Foods for the New year, Bryn Mannino says:In China, Japan and other Asian countries, it’s customary to eat long noodles, signify longevity, on New Year’s Day. Since the noodles are never to be broken or shortened during the cooking process, the typical preparation for “Long-Life Noodles” is a stir-fry.” [Read more…]

Please like & share:
post

A Closer Look at Your Christmas Ham

HamHam is one of the traditional main dishes served at Christmas, and it is fascinating to take a closer look at both the history of this favorite piece of meat and the different ways of preparing it.

In The Reluctant Gourmet G. Stephen Jones writes about its origins: …Apparently, serving ham arises from the pre-Christian Norse tradition of killing a boar and serving it to honor Freya, one of the Norse Gods. In AD times, St. Stephen, whose feast day is December 26th, is often depicted as serving a boar’s head as an offering. And, as often happens when diverse traditions converge around the feasting table: Christmas ham was born…” [Read more…]

Please like & share:
post

A Cake Just for Christmas – Buche de Noel – Yule log

Yule LogThe rich yet delicate bûche de Noël (Yule log) is one of those desserts that make a frequent appearance around Christmas, and it is most popular in France and in places that bear French influence. The bûche de Noël consists of a sponge cake rolled to look like a log and iced with chocolate buttercream or ganache.

Most Yule logs will be presented so that they look like tree limbs that have been chopped off, and some bakers will even cut off a portion of the roll and arrange it to make it look as if the limb has a bit of a branch attached to it. Cake decorators take great pains to create a bark like effect on the log’s icing, and it is not unusual to see the cake garnished with white frosting or powdered sugar to resemble snow. [Read more…]

Please like & share:
post

A Christmas Feast in Spain

Christmas in SpainIn Spain the celebratory Christmas dinner, is held on Christmas Eve which is called Noche Buena or “The Good Night”. On the evening of December 24, most families will hear Mass in the evening or at midnight. Whichever service they attend, they will make sure there is time for a sumptuous Christmas feast.

In About.com’s  Spanish Christmas Menu – Menú de Noche Buena, Lisa and Tony Sierra write, “In Spain it is celebrated with a large family feast, which is eaten late in the evening and can last a couple hours. Some families attend midnight mass before or after, although many families are still finishing dinner around the table at midnight! In Spain, Christmas Eve is a time for celebrating in neighborhood bars and cafes, and around the table with family and friends.” With this introduction, they introduce a delicious Spanish feast that includes everything from tapas (appetizers) to soup, main dishes, dessert, and Cava, Spanish sparkling wine.

[Read more…]

Please like & share:
© 2009 - Vinfo Pty Ltd. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our
Privacy Statement and Terms & Conditions and Earnings Disclaimer.